Doing a Juice Cleanse

A juice-only diet might leave you feeling light and clean. Problem is, juices have almost zero protein. So you’ll lose water weight and muscle mass, but not fat. And once you go back to solid food, those pounds will pile right back on.

Skipping Meals

Passing on breakfast, lunch, or dinner might be an easy way to drastically slash your calorie intake. But doing so will probably backfire. Eating just one meal daily  would wound up to gorging on food—and packing on unhealthy belly fat.

Going Gluten-Free

Despite what some might say, there’s no scientific evidence showing that a gluten-free diet will help you get lean. In fact, it might do the opposite—especially if you rely on gluten-free packaged foods like breads or muffins. Manufacturers add extra fat, salt, and sugar to make up for the missing flavor and texture of gluten. So these foods are often higher in calories, For example, one slice of Whole-Grain bread packs in four grams of protein, three grams of fiber, and zero sugar while one slice of Gluten Free White Sandwich Bread contains nearly as many calories in addition to zero fiber and half the amount of protein. Instead of going gluten-free, nix simple carbs like white bread and slim down with the help of better-for-you starches like quinoa, fruit, beans.

Personal trainers would recommend these tactics to keep you motivated and inspired to work out.

1. CHANGE YOUR PERSPECTIVE

Shift your thinking from couch potato mentality to thinking like an athlete. “Take inspiration from everyone you meet — even people who can’t be physically active,” committing to a fitness routine begins in your head.

2. SET A GOAL

There’s nothing more motivating than seeing a goal in front of you. Register early and commit to an exercise program that will get you in shape by race day.

“Set realistic goals that include clear milestones, and as you progress toward your goal, you’ll find a ripple effect occurs and things fall into place in your work, home life, and health,” says Stacy Fowler, a Denver-based personal trainer and life coach.

 

3.THINK FUN AND VARIETY

By nature, humans need change and variety to stay motivated. We also need to have fun — even while we’re working hard. Do both!

Whether it’s a toning and sculpting class that changes choreography every week or a trail run that changes scenery every season, design your exercise routine around a variety of exercise methods. Make sure you include activities you truly enjoy and look forward to doing, and can even make you forget you’re working out — like dancing, hula hooping, or playing sports with family and friends.

 

In strength training and fitness, the squat is a compound, full body exercise that trains primarily the muscles of the thighs, hips and buttocks, quadriceps femoris muscle (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, vastus intermediusand rectus femoris), hamstrings, as well as strengthening the bones, ligaments and insertion of the tendons throughout the lower body.

Squats are considered a vital exercise for increasing the strength and size of the legs as well as developing core strength. Individuals who are interested in strength training can utilize barbell squat in training and rehabilitation programs. If executed with proper form, the squat has the potential to develop knee stability. On the other hand, if done incorrectly, injuries to the knees and back can occur.

Squats are typically used to hone back, thigh, and hip stability. Isometrically, the lower back, the upper back, the abdominal, the trunk muscles, the coastal muscles, and the shoulders and arms are all essential to the exercise and thus are trained when squatting with the proper form.

The squat is one of the three lifts in the strength sport of power lifting, together with dead lifts and bench press. It is also considered a staple in many popular recreational exercise programs.

 

 

Plank jacks

Adding this type of jumping jack to the standard plank engages your abs even more.

Dolphin plank

This yoga hybrid works your back, abs, and shoulders. Compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups give you a really big bang for your strength-training buck!

Resistance plank

Add a resistance band to work your core, shoulders, AND hamstrings. Place band around wrists and ankles; form a straight-arm plank. Move left hand and right foot out 6 inches. Return to start; repeat on opposite sides. That’s 1 rep. Do 10.

Plank pelvis tuck

Plank/pelvis tuck

This exercise works both the rectus abdominus (six-pack) and transverse abdominus (waist-cinching corset muscles).

Lie facedown with legs extended, elbows bent, feet hip-width apart, elbows shoulder-width apart. Contract abs, then tuck toes to lift body, elbows directly under shoulders. Hold for 4 breaths. Bend knees (do not touch ground), tilt pelvis up; hold for 4 breaths. Keeping abs tight, straighten legs, hold for 4 breaths. Repeat 3 times.

The plank is one of the best exercises you can do for your core because it builds isometric strength to help sculpt your waistline and improve your posture. And depending on the type of plank you try, you can also engage your back, arms, shoulders, glutes, and hamstrings. Win!

Whether you can hold a plank for 20 seconds or two minutes, you’ll love these fresh variations on the standard move.

 

forearm plank

Forearm plank

This is what most people consider to be a standard plank. Lie facedown with legs extended and elbows bent and directly under shoulders; clasp your hands. Feet should be hip-width apart, and elbows should be shoulder-width apart. Contract your abs, then tuck your toes to lift your body (forearms remain on the ground); you should be in a straight line from head to heels. Hold for 60 seconds or as long as you can.

Straight-arm plank

Straight-arm plank

Health contributing yoga and wellness editor Kristin McGee demonstrates this plank done at the top of push-up position. Kneel on all fours with hands directly under shoulders. Come onto toes, contract abs, and straighten legs; keep body in line from head to heels.

In his book, Eat that Frog, Brian Tracy discusses the Momentum Principle of Success.  In Tracy’s words:

This principle says that although it may take tremendous amounts of energy to overcome inertia and get started initially, it then takes far less energy to keep going.”1

There is much wisdom in his words.  Sometimes, the hardest part of reaching a goal is just getting started.  That first day of doing things differently or the first experience of bypassing an unhealthy treat in favor of a food that will give you more energy can be daunting.  It isn’t easy and it certainly isn’t fun.

So how do you get that momentum?  How do you start moving?  Accountability is the answer.  Having someone else involved in your efforts can be the most important factor in your success.

It is hard to change lifelong habits on your own.  You need radical motivation that comes from involving others in your efforts.  Setting deadlines, making commitments and entering contests all provide an external motivation that will carry you through even the toughest temptations.

And once you get started, you will find that the momentum principle kicks in and it becomes easier and easier to keep going.

Start NOW

You can make that moving target come to a screeching halt and blast the bull’s eye right out of it by taking a few minutes to write down what you want.  Don’t make it your goals too broad; be specific.  And then begin brainstorming ways to get others involved with you; that will provide your momentum.  Success is within your reach.  You can do this!

Oh, and remember, we’re here to help you the entire way!

 

Source:

1Tracy, Brian (2007-01-01). Eat That Frog!: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time (p. 107). Berrett-Koehler Publishers. Kindle Edition.

ZigZiglaronce said, “If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time.” And each of us knows from our own experience that he is right.  The general flow of human life tends to be toward ease and comfort.  One day flows into the next, and many of us never quite get around to turning our good intentions into reality.

Those ‘good intentions,’ while no doubt admirable, tend to remain unrealized mainly because they are too vague.  Vague ideas are impossible to focus on and aim for; they are moving targets.

Do you have moving targets in your life?  Perhaps you want to eat a more healthy diet or lose the winter weight that has crept upon you.  Maybe you just want to establish a regular workout routine and stick with it this time.

The keys to your success are two-fold:  steady the target and create momentum. 

How to stop a moving target

Imagine a target shooter trying to hit a small bull’s eye on a distant target.  He begins to aim, but then the target suddenly moves to the right, and before he can position himself to aim again, the target darts to the left.  Will he ever hit that target?  Not likely.

Without setting specific goals, your good intentions are exactly like that moving target.  You would like to lose some weight, feel a little better, make a change in your diet–but without clearly defined goals and methods, you can’t focus and make it happen.

The way to steady the target so you can finally hit the bull’s eye is to define your goalsand write them down:

  • How much weight do you want to lose?
  • What kind of changes do you want to make in your diet?
  • How many days per week do you want to exercise?
  • Which article of clothing do you wish would fit your body again?
  • How much weight would you like to lift while strength training?

Once you know where you want to end up, you are much more likely to get there.

But you have to start moving toward your goals.  That is where momentum comes in.

 

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If you keep doing what you have always done, you will get the results you have always gotten.

It’s time to do something different.  Ask yourself this question:  If I keep doing what I am doing right now, will I achieve what I want to achieve?If you answered no, then it’s time for a change.

Get your calendar out and decide when you want to see your first wave of results.  Be realistic:  make sure you give yourself time to really dig in and see changes. But challenge yourself too—make it a little tough so you can take full advantage of the power of urgency.

But a deadline may not be enough.  Why?  Because you may be tempted to move it.  Deadlines are not supposed to be moving targets!  The best way to prevent deadline-creep is to get competitive.

Entering into a competition or contest is a sure way to give you the edge you need to keep yourself on track and finish strong.

There is something very motivating about competing with others.  Just knowing that your effort and results are going to be measured alongside others really will give you an extra boost in motivation.

This is a time when a little peer pressure is useful!  And you will find that those with whom you are in competition will also be your biggest cheerleaders:  they know exactly what you are going through and will be there to encourage you to keep moving.

Deadlines and contests form the perfect combination to guarantee your fitness success: put them to work for you!Spring is close enough to give you a push, but still far enough away to ensure that you have enough time to get some serious work done.  Plan now to greet spring and warmer weather with no regrets!

 

Have you ever told yourself that you are going to lose weight and get fit in time for spring, only to be frustrated when warm weather rolls around?

It’s easy to hide behind heavy winter clothes, but when the mercury starts climbing, the clothes get lighter and we can’t hide any more.  “Why didn’t I start working out weeks ago?” we ask ourselves.  “If only I had started sooner!”

The best way to protect yourself from a regret-filled spring is to set a deadline and start NOW.  Deadlines are powerful motivators.  Without a deadline, you really have no set-point toward which to work.  You have nothing pushing you.

We need to be pushed.

Deadlines create a sense of urgency.  They help you position yourself to succeed, because that final date is always staring back at you.  It forces you to prioritize and strategize.  Otherwise, you will let things slide…you will keep putting off the workout, and insisting that tomorrow you will start eating better.

Without a deadline, tomorrow never comes.

The oatmeal diet is famous for helping with weight management,weight loss, lowering the risk of cancer and lessening cholesterol.

Typically, the oatmeal diet has three stages which last a total of 30 days. During your first two stages, you replace one or two foods a day with oatmeal.

During your first week, the list of allowed foods is limited just to oatmeal. In the last part of the second phase that listing will be filled with bananas, berries, apples, celery, carrots, chicken breast, fish, coffee and sugar-free pudding.

Your third phase starts after the first 30 days of oatmealing. After that you can return to your standard diet, seldom adding oatmeal (only once per day.)

The pros of an oatmeal diet:

healthy weight loss
lowers cholesterol
may lower the possibility of certain types of cancer
Cons of an oatmeal diet

Commercially manufactured and packaged oats almost certainly contain considerable amounts of gluten. This type of protein can be adverse for some people, especially those with celiac illness.For those who cannot tolerate gluten, you would need to eat only certified gluten free oatmeal on this diet. That is because the weak condition of the digestive system in people with this illness, can cause nutrient deficiencies.

The characteristics of an oatmeal diet:
Be sure to have a consultation with your physician to know this diet is the most suitable for you. Don’t forget to drink 2-2,5 liters of water per day as a minimum
Check the most appropriate sort of oatmeal production for you.
You have to drink one glass of warm water each morning